The Pacific Triangle, The Pacific doughboy, and the wave


Folks just don’t seem to have their arms around the disarray in the earth sciences these days. Climate science and plate theory are going to have to be rebuilt from the ground up, or more appropriately from the core-mantle boundary.

Pacific Triangle, Doughboy. Wave

This rather ugly image shows the current position of the  Pacific Doughboy (LLSVP) in dark colored elevation contours above the core. This converted in an unsatisfying way from arcmap. The lighter colors are higher elevations and the highest points, some 2900 km above the core are supposed to be white but show only as unfilled contour line.

Of course, this doughboy should really be shown at its actual position far below, but it is impossible to turn off surface imagery in Google earth and all one would see is blue ocean.

The Pacific Triangle and the evolved seafloor isochrons that represent the wave or motion of the spreading ridge away from the triangle are shown in their Paleocene (60ma) position according to Christopher Scotese.

Google applied some emergent logic to decide which colors would express where, but all in all one can get some sense of the relationship of the forms. While it would have been fun to find the triangle at one of the peaks in the doughboy, the triangle seems to have moved modestly through time and we have no idea how the doughboys have behaved through time.

Austral view

Here is a more Austral view.

Our spreading ridges are clearly in motion. Our mantle is clearly stratified and not convecting in anywhere near the normal sense. We have two asymmetrical monstrous extrusions from the core (Doughboys). Something is supplying an enormous amount of energy to maintain mobile shallow pools of molten rock in both linear (ocean ridges) and point (hotspot) forms.

Oh well, venturing into the unknown is way more fun than reciting liturgy.

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This entry was posted in Geography, Geoid, Geology, Large Igneous Provinces, LLSVP, LLSVP's are Doughboys, Oceanography, Pacific Triangle, Paleogeography, Plate Tectonics, Seafloor Isochrons, Seismic Tomography and tagged , . Bookmark the permalink.

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